Category Archives: recruitment

Interviews – How to deal with rejection

We’ve recently started to measure the candidate experience in our interview process. We’re early on in this process, but it’s proving interesting reading so far (see below). This survey is sent out to everybody that has an on-site interview at Lost My Name. It’s purpose to is to provide a platform to share feedback once the dust has settled post-interviews. As you’ll see from the graph below, we’re scoring OK, not great but not bad. There are certainly numerous ways that we can and will improve:

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I don’t ever expect to achieve full marks on these scores because a lot of people haven’t proceeded to the next interview stage either as a result of our decision making process or their own. However, it does give us an indication of how and where we can improve.

Looking at the results and comments, it really hit home to me the range of emotions that a candidate goes through.

Firstly, rejection is not a nice feeling. When you’ve had your heart set on a job, told family and friends and built up the excitement, it makes it all the more difficult to take. So what is the best way to respond and turn that rejection into a positive learning experience?

  1. Let it out – I’m not advocating a public display of outrage, but you need to release the anger/disappointment/frustration of missing out on that job that you really wanted. How?
    • Write it down – how you’re feeling. How did you find the experience of interviewing? What you liked and didn’t like? Why you think you missed out on the role after all? How did it make you feel to be told that isn’t right for you?
    • Talk to people – no doubt in the coming hours, days or even weeks you’ll speak to those close to you, recruiters, acquaintances and the topic will come up. You’re likely to receive the standard ‘it’s their loss’ or ‘it wasn’t meant to be’ or even ‘you should be proud for getting so far’….let’s face it, none of this really makes you feel any better does it? Find those that you trust and are willing to listen and talk through it, I promise you’ll feel better about it.
  2. Give it time – I’ve been rejected for roles in the past, ones that I’d invested significant time in preparing for…it didn’t work out and that sucks. The initial feelings of being gutted, then annoyed, then slightly bitter are all part of the process. However, like with any feeling, they pass. My biggest advice is to not jump straight to the next thing, take some time to consider options and let the dust settle.
  3. What did you learn? This is where you can turn a negative into a positive, share this experience with the company that you interviewed with. How you felt you were treated, what you enjoyed about the process. At Lost My Name, candidates can do this with the above mentioned method. Any company that is vested in improving its interview process and delivering a great candidate experience will be glad of the feedback.
  4. Future interviews – consider the feedback you received from the company. What did you do well, where did you fall short? Leverage this and take it forward to your next interview. You’ll be more confident in yourself. If there is one thing that I value extremely highly from an interviewee, it’s someone who can talk through a difficult time/situation and show key learnings from it. Successes tell you so much about a person, failures give a real insight into character, resilience and courage. Some of the qualities that we value so dearly in our teams.

You may or may not agree with the advice given above and that’s fine. Everyone is different and will deal with awkward and difficult situations differently. What I hope you will agree on is that a negative can be turned into a positive and the initial pain and frustration can quickly transform into a feeling of personal growth and maturity.
I’d love to hear other people’s views and comments on this subject as it’s one often ignored when we thinking about hiring and interviewing.

Are we becoming a bunch of recruitment robots?

2015. Recruitment tools – we have plenty. Too many? Maybe.

There was a time (before my era, mind) when recruitment was about a few simple things… people, getting to know these people, building a network and connecting this network with opportunities at your company (clients if on the agency side). Over simplified? Yes. Is this simplistic view compatible with modern recruitment?

Today’s market, particularly in the world of technology, sees the candidate in the driving seat. As recruiters, our task of finding and attracting some of the best talent that our employers demand is harder than ever. This has of course led to the rise of what I call ‘The (Recruitment) Tool Army’!

‘Recruitment is broken’ they say? Fear not; let’s build a host of products that will solve everything! Buy this and your life will change forever.

I’d like to think that as recruiters, we’re not all so gullible, or are we?

I’m not going to waffle on about what tools are good and what aren’t. There’s too much debate on that subject already and there are too many tools to cover. My gripe is with some of my fellow recruiters. As part of my job I speak to a lot of candidates, I also speak to a fair few recruiters. Some truly excellent ones. These are the ones who really get what is required and actually execute on it by trying things that others can’t or won’t.

There are unfortunately others who have forgotten what this job is actually all about. Recruiters use tools and moan when they don’t instantly solve their problems. Why would you rely on it to take your place in recruitment?

Have we lost sight of what’s really important?

I think we have to an extent. Professional and successful people want to surround themselves with smart people, they form communities of like minded people. Why? Because they continually want to learn. We, as recruiters, need to follow suit. Developers have communities, so do doctors, mathematicians, marketers. There’s no excuse not to.

So what should we do about it?

Go back to basics and have a desire to learn. When I think about recruitment and what it should involve there are certain things that come to mind:

  • Relationship-building
  • Hard work
  • Communication
  • Research
  • Respect
  • Good Timing

Think about how you would want to be approached and consider the mindset of a candidate. In the context of someone’s career they only interact with recruiters for a very small portion of that. Go to great lengths to ensure that it’s a good experience. Through showing somebody respect and that you’ve bothered to try and understand what they do you’re far more likely to get their trust. If you show you care and want what’s best for them how could somebody not appreciate it?

Learning – build a community with fellow recruiters. Some have really great advice and experience that they are only too happy to share. The London startup community is one place where this is happening. A group of recruiters are doing more to learn from each other and more importantly give honest feedback (through events).

The ‘War on Talent’ is not just one of skills shortages and competition. For recruiters, it’s also about reclaiming ground. Tools are there to complement us, not do our jobs for us. Be prepared, transparent, go to events (if you’re brave enough, speak at them – it’s worth it!) meet your candidates and get to know them.

Show understanding and a willingness to learn and people will respect you. Use this as a base and build from there. Utilise the tools you have to make things a little easier. Don’t become the ‘tool’ who blames everything else when they don’t succeed.

Company Culture – All or Nothing

Culture is how organisations ‘do things’ ” – Robert Katanga. Today it’s used to attract candidates and build an employer brand.

We place huge weight behind our career moves based on things like work environment, the people as well as career development and salary.

Companies strive to get this right – some throw huge resources behind it, you may even see a ‘Chief Culture Officer’ in place (usually a sign that the culture is so bad they’ve had to employ someone to try to sort it out).

So what is Company Culture?

I recently attended an event on this very subject – Culturevist. People there from a wide range of professions – Lawyers, Recruiters, Customer Success, Marketing, Communications etc. All gathered together discussing culture in the workplace– success stories, failures, people seeking help. People there because they care about the environment they work in.

This, for me, shows that culture represents the values and behaviours of employees that make up a company. As an employer can you really answer questions like – Are you an employer/part of a company that really does care about employees? Do you just want them to perform well at work or go that step further and really get behind a positive ‘work-life’ balance?

All or Nothing?

What did Culturevist teach me about Company Culture?

  • It’s a collective effort– a movement driven from the top downwards. Driving culture from the bottom up is admirable but the will of employees can count for little if those at the top don’t truly believe in it.
  • You can’t just create a culture– you have to show a process towards making it work.
  • How? –Being transparent, listening and then acting on what you’ve heard. Having an identity, values and living and breathing them!
  • Develop it – Through listening to your employees you identify issues earlier and take necessary action

We want to believe in a company, its products and its people. Essentially we want to be part of a story where we can make a difference.

Working in an environment that allows you to do this is the first step. Great benefits may help in attracting you but they won’t buy long-term loyalty. It’s the sense of control and community that we all crave. Make someone feel part of a team and in control of their own destiny and you’ll find that you’ll have an engaged, inspired and happy workforce.

….but before you get too comfortable. This is an ‘All or Nothing’ game and one that needs to be continually worked at. Companies evolve and so will your culture.