Category Archives: interview

Interviews – How to deal with rejection

We’ve recently started to measure the candidate experience in our interview process. We’re early on in this process, but it’s proving interesting reading so far (see below). This survey is sent out to everybody that has an on-site interview at Lost My Name. It’s purpose to is to provide a platform to share feedback once the dust has settled post-interviews. As you’ll see from the graph below, we’re scoring OK, not great but not bad. There are certainly numerous ways that we can and will improve:

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I don’t ever expect to achieve full marks on these scores because a lot of people haven’t proceeded to the next interview stage either as a result of our decision making process or their own. However, it does give us an indication of how and where we can improve.

Looking at the results and comments, it really hit home to me the range of emotions that a candidate goes through.

Firstly, rejection is not a nice feeling. When you’ve had your heart set on a job, told family and friends and built up the excitement, it makes it all the more difficult to take. So what is the best way to respond and turn that rejection into a positive learning experience?

  1. Let it out – I’m not advocating a public display of outrage, but you need to release the anger/disappointment/frustration of missing out on that job that you really wanted. How?
    • Write it down – how you’re feeling. How did you find the experience of interviewing? What you liked and didn’t like? Why you think you missed out on the role after all? How did it make you feel to be told that isn’t right for you?
    • Talk to people – no doubt in the coming hours, days or even weeks you’ll speak to those close to you, recruiters, acquaintances and the topic will come up. You’re likely to receive the standard ‘it’s their loss’ or ‘it wasn’t meant to be’ or even ‘you should be proud for getting so far’….let’s face it, none of this really makes you feel any better does it? Find those that you trust and are willing to listen and talk through it, I promise you’ll feel better about it.
  2. Give it time – I’ve been rejected for roles in the past, ones that I’d invested significant time in preparing for…it didn’t work out and that sucks. The initial feelings of being gutted, then annoyed, then slightly bitter are all part of the process. However, like with any feeling, they pass. My biggest advice is to not jump straight to the next thing, take some time to consider options and let the dust settle.
  3. What did you learn? This is where you can turn a negative into a positive, share this experience with the company that you interviewed with. How you felt you were treated, what you enjoyed about the process. At Lost My Name, candidates can do this with the above mentioned method. Any company that is vested in improving its interview process and delivering a great candidate experience will be glad of the feedback.
  4. Future interviews – consider the feedback you received from the company. What did you do well, where did you fall short? Leverage this and take it forward to your next interview. You’ll be more confident in yourself. If there is one thing that I value extremely highly from an interviewee, it’s someone who can talk through a difficult time/situation and show key learnings from it. Successes tell you so much about a person, failures give a real insight into character, resilience and courage. Some of the qualities that we value so dearly in our teams.

You may or may not agree with the advice given above and that’s fine. Everyone is different and will deal with awkward and difficult situations differently. What I hope you will agree on is that a negative can be turned into a positive and the initial pain and frustration can quickly transform into a feeling of personal growth and maturity.
I’d love to hear other people’s views and comments on this subject as it’s one often ignored when we thinking about hiring and interviewing.

Sales Candidates – What are you missing?

Sell me this pen? Really?!

How many times have you been asked that question in an interview? Too many would be my guess. It’s awkward, outdated and pretty useless.

Sales as a profession is constantly evolving, companies are embracing new methods and techniques to structure their sales process and bring out the best in their teams…even adopting agile methodologies like Scrum, commonly used in software development.

In the field of sales recruitment, competition is fierce. In a buoyant market companies will rapidly scale teams. Some candidates will thrive where as others will be left behind. So what can you do to boost your profile and take the next step in your career?

The key is in the preparation, which I have noted below:

The CV

Like it or not, your CV plays a part in getting you that initial interview. According to some research, recruiters spend on average between 5-7 seconds scanning a CV. So why not make your CV as clear and concise as possible? Showcase your skills and experience in a few direct points:

  • Role and product/service sold
  • Revenue generated – per annum, quarter, month (how ever your sales cycle works)
  • Average deal size
  • Average deal length
  • Major achievements

The amount of CVs I see without even half of these points is quite remarkable. This is your career; you’ve worked hard for these achievements so why not highlight them? Even if you have had a tough year you can articulate the challenges and successes briefly and clearly.

Build your network

Don’t wait for opportunities to come to you. Build your brand, reach out to potential employers and start developing relationships. The best opportunities will come from your network so start reaching out now!

Do your research

When preparing for an interview, go into detail. Are you fully confident that you can answer questions posed and explain the product that you could be selling? Break it down into a few key areas:

  • Sales Cycle – Do you currently manage all of the sales cycle? How do you generate leads? How many deals have you closed? How do develop and manage your sales pipeline?
  • Revenue – Know your figures, the total and breakdown
  • Product knowledge – Be confident that you know the companies products and are able to explain their offering. Why not go a step further and consider these products/services and their place in the market – Who are the main competitors? What are the USP’s of that product/service?
  • Failures –everyone  Why not embrace it? Detail accounts or sales you’ve lost. Don’t be afraid; rather take the opportunity to show what you have learnt from it. Demonstrating that level of self-awareness will help you throughout your career!

This isn’t the complete list of how to secure that next step in your sales career. However from my experience of interviewing and hiring these candidates this will give you a solid foundation. Too much time is wasted in the waffle of explaining your role, be concise, highlight your skills and achievements and be prepared to explain the methods you chose to reach the end result. Explaining the method is just as important as detailing your achievements!

Finally, show that you are passionate about your career in sales…oh and don’t forget to close, it’s an interview and you’re a sales person after all!

Having the self-awareness to boost your performance and career

A while back, if you’d have asked me what are the most important features that a company would want I would have produced a list along the lines of ‘technical skills, communication, teamwork…’ I quickly realised that beneath this lays one major attribute that can increase or decrease all of the others – self-awareness. This is a key feature of how I recruit and one that can really play a big part in boosting not only your performance but also your career.

Self-awareness is the ‘Conscious knowledge of one’s own character, feelings, motives, and desires’. Now how do motives, desires, feelings and character relate to boosting your performance and career? Behind each high performer there will be a method of working, a way that that the individual has found to be successful.  Some will be conventional like following a set process, whilst others will be less so. Now why am I rambling on about is this I hear you ask? This is so blatantly obvious!

…Well please take a step back for a second. A moment to consider what has allowed you to develop your career. Many of you will answer ‘I worked really hard’ or ‘I gave myself a target and reached it’. These are fine but the question you need to be asking is how and why? Questioning your methods allows you to look deeper into your performance. There will always be ways you can improve and you won’t find out the honest answer until you delve deeper.

How do we increase self-awareness? Can it be done?

Some will argue that you are either self-aware or your not. I disagree.  It’s not as simple as that. I believe that a higher level of self-awareness can be achieved through continually looking back retrospectively on your performance and considering what factors made you successful or not.  This seems simple but how many of you do this? I’m not talking about quarterly on annual reviews. These are specific instances, conversations, tasks. The key is in the detail.  10 minutes during the day or on the journey home…review, analyse the results, jot down some ideas and alternatives.

But surely this can only take you so far?

Correct. To be truly successful you need to combine the getting the job done, hard work, relationship building, adaptability and a slice of good fortune. Combine these and you will do a great job. Understand why they are important, what you have learnt in the process and how you can evolve going forwards and you, my friend, could be a superstar!